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22 September 2017
20 January 2016

Tashkent Declaration achieving peace between Pakistan and India

Tashkent Declaration achieving peace between Pakistan and India

The Tashkent Declaration was signed fifty years ago on the 10th of January 1966. The Declaration was an agreement resolving the Indo-Pakistani war conflict of 1965. The USSR played a crucial part in achieving peace between the two countries.

The war between Pakistan and India was not long-lasting. It started in August 1965 and was over in September 1965. The conflict started because of the territory issue and the religious factor. Islamabad tried to capture the Kashmir state which is mostly populated by Muslims. Pakistan orchestrated the rebellion of the state Muslim population. The Indian authorities managed to cope with the rebellion, but they could not prevent warfare with the neighbouring country. The conflict could turn into a major war as China was ready to take part in the war and support Pakistan. By that time it was a while that China considered India as its geopolitical rival.

Tashkent Declaration achieving peace between Pakistan and India

The resolution of the conflict in the South Asia was very important for Moscow. The Soviet statesman Aleksey Kosigyn himself was the mediator between the leaders of Pakistan and India Muhammad Ayub Khan and Lal Bahadur Shastri. The argument between the South Asian states has become the major conflict after the Second World War. The Pakistani and Indian leaders arrived in the capital of Uzbekistan in January 1966. Tashkent was considered to be one of the most beautiful cities in the USSR.  All the required conditions were provided to achieve success of the negotiations.

Tashkent Declaration achieving peace between Pakistan and India

The peace achieved at the negotiations did not last for long. Another conflict started in 1971 between other neighbouring countries. The conflict led to the territorial changes in Pakistan. The eastern part of the country fell away to form a new independent country Bangladesh. Pakistan and India are still arguing with each other. On the one hand, atomic weapon in both countries serves as a kind of guarantee that neither Islamabad nor New Delhi start a full-scale war. On the other hand, there is a risk that either of the countries can initiate military actions at some point. The consequences of the conflict might have impact on the entire world.